PRFCT Tips

Tagged with "Clover"

Clover lawn

St. Patrick's Day is one of our favorite days of the year. Clover is everywhere on March 17! So why are those cute little trifolium so hard to find once spring rolls around?

One hundred years ago, clover was considered a sign of a "healthy" lawn. Diversity was prized and the ideal lawn was sprinkled with flowers. Lawns fertilized themselves naturally with regular boosts of nitrogen from clover and mulched grass clippings.

What changed? Chemical companies found themselves with lots of extra product on their hands after the end of World War II. Some of those products could be turned into fertilizer, and some could be used as herbicides. Marketing teams turned clover into the new enemy, selling consumers herbicides to rid their yards of "weeds" and synthetic fertilizers to replace what those "weeds" supplied naturally. Before long, the uniform, military-style lawn became all the rage.

A lot has changed since the end of World War II, but our lawns are still stuck in their Baby Boomer phase. It's getting harder and harder to find those lucky four-leaved shamrocks. Who's ready for a 21st-century clover revolution?

Clover heart

Dear clover,

Why is "love" at the heart of your name? Because there's so much to love about your lovely green leaves!

1. You fertilize our lawns—for free. No need for synthetic fertilizer when you pull nitrogen from the air and release it back into the soil every time we mow.

2. You stay green under the toughest conditions. Those nitrogen-fixing roots run deep, keeping our lawns lively and lush even in the hottest, driest months.

3. Pollinators love your flowers—and we love pollinators. (We've got tips on avoiding bee stings in clover lawns.)

4. You're the stuff of childhood memories. Doesn't every kid love hunting for your lucky four leaves?

See you in spring!

XOXO,
The PRFCT Team

Clover

So, you are leaving your clippings for 80% of your lawn’s nutrient needs. What is free and easy to add to that? If you’re lucky, the PRFCT ingredient is already growing right beneath your toes.

Clover is a nitrogen fixer—it pulls nitrogen from the air and releases it back into the soil when mowed. Those nitrogen-fixing roots run deep, keeping clover green even in hot, dry months. Your grass will love the nitrogen boost every time you mow, and the environment will love you for not adding more fertilizer.

Worried about bees? It's true that bees (and butterflies!) love clover flowers, but they are not aggressive away from their hives. Bees feasting on clover flowers should not sting unless stepped on directly. You can prevent stings by avoiding large clover patches, wearing shoes when on a flowering clover lawn, and mowing as soon as the flowers open. The cut flowers are also nitrogen-packed, so be sure to leave them along with the rest of your clippings.

clover

There are those who use a lot of energy and toxins to keep clover out of their lawns. What’s wrong with clover anyway?

Clover fixes nitrogen, providing important nutrients to keep your lawn healthy and reduce the need for fertilizer.

Clover adds green to those hot dry difficult spots that grass doesn’t like, helping your lawn to look lively and lush. Stop wasting time and money trying to kill clover….think different, embrace it for all the good it can do!

And look for the one with four leaves…..

Tags: clover feeding

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