PRFCT Tips

Tagged with "Disease"

Neighborhood

Firstest Greenest Lawns

March 23, 2018

If a green lawn is a sign of health, then the first brightest, greenest lawn in the spring has to be good, right? If you knew that what it takes to make a lawn jump the season, you might think differently.

Nature has its own schedule, worked out over millenia. Greening up earlier than nature intends requires heavy doses of fast-acting nitrogen. Much of it ends up in runoff and pollutes your nearby beloved water bodies. Over-fertilization causes fast, weak growth, at the expense of deep, healthy roots. This chemical-fueled growth is more susceptible to fungal diseases and insect attacks, which means more chemicals will be needed later on to correct preventable issues. This is the beginning of a cycle of chemical dependence – your lawn on drugs.

Why do you need your lawn to be green before its time? Will you think differently? When you see early green lawns, will you give them the (green) thumbs down? Will you be proud that your lawn will not join the party until it is old enough to drink (natural nutrients) responsibly?

grass cut with a dull blade

How Sharp Are Your Blades?

August 05, 2016

Can't remember the last time you sharpened your lawnmower blades? Then your mower is probably overdue.

Why does it matter? Dull mower blades tear grass, which invites fungus infections. If your grass has ragged edges or you can see white fibers hanging from the tips, your mower blades are too dull.

Privet hedge

Sprinkling Your Hedges?

July 29, 2016

How much water do your privet hedges need this summer? Not much!

If your privet was planted over two years ago, let it be. Well-established trees and shrubs in good soil, including privets, do not need any irrigation.

Newly planted privets—less than two years in the ground—should only be watered at the base. Spraying the leaves is the principle cause of scale disease that will kill your privet. See our drip hoses tip for more info on where to place hoses and when to remove them.

root flare mature tree

Many of you will be celebrating Arbor Day this week by planting trees in your yards, parks, or elsewhere in your community. We could not be happier! But before you pick up your shovel, please take a moment to locate the root flare of the tree you are planting.

“What’s the root flare?,” you may ask.

The root flare is where the roots of the tree begin to spread out from the trunk. You should be able to locate this flare even in young trees in nursery containers, but you may have to brush away some soil to find it.

Once you find it, do not bury the root flare when planting the tree.

Why? Covering the flare will bury and destroy bark that the tree relies on for oxygen and protection from diseases. And roots that are buried too deeply often grow upward in search of the proper mixture of water, nutrients, and oxygen. Roots growing in the wrong direction can eventually wrap around the tree, strangling the trunk as it grows.

Placing material against the tree’s trunk can also cause the bark to rot and leave the tree susceptible to infection.

Show your trees how much you love them this Arbor Day. Plant them properly and you'll be enjoying their company for decades to come.

Create mulch rings around your trees, not volcanoes.

sprinkler

Your Seed is Planted, Germinated, and Growing. Now, how to water PRFCTly?

Now that your new grass seedlings are more than 1.5 inches tall it is time to encourage their roots to grow deeper by watering properly.

Allow the top inch of soil to get dry between waterings. Depending on the weather, this might mean watering two to three times per week for 10 to 20 minutes. Try to restrict this frequency to newly seeded areas.

Do NOT "set and forget" your irrigation system. Overwatering will lead to weak and fungus-prone grass.

Less is more.


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