PRFCT Tips

Tagged with "Fall"

2018 03 16 07.06.42

Slow to Mow a Meadow

September 21, 2018

Are you mowing your meadow in the fall? Not so fast please, don’t mow, let it go till the spring!

Why?  For one thing, it looks much more beautiful than stubble.

Also, there are lots of ecosystem benefits:  
Seed heads have time to develop and disperse
Habitat and food is provided for wildlife:  think crickets, bumblebees, turkeys, American goldfinches, hawks and owls.

Mow in the spring, just before new growth begins, 8-12” high (habitat retained for solitary bees) and, best if you can rake off the cuttings.

2018 03 16 07.06.42

Slow to Mow a Meadow

September 21, 2018

Are you mowing your meadow in the fall? Not so fast please, don’t mow, let it go till the spring!

Why?  For one thing, it looks much more beautiful than stubble.

Also, there are lots of ecosystem benefits:  
Seed heads have time to develop and disperse
Habitat and food is provided for wildlife:  think crickets, bumblebees, turkeys, American goldfinches, hawks and owls.

Mow in the spring, just before new growth begins, 8-12” high (habitat retained for solitary bees) and, best if you can rake off the cuttings.

Webworms Ev G

Spare the Scary Webs

September 07, 2018

If you have noticed some scary looking webs all over your trees, don't worry, it's just a late summer meal for fall webworms and they don't harm your trees. Put down the spray… their webbing will actually protect them from it.
 


Webworms are the harmless caterpillar form of native moths and only eat leaves that are nearing the end of their life-cycle, not new growth or buds. Because they are native, webworms have over 50 natural predators and many parasites that keep their populations in check so that you don't have to.
 


If you really do not want them, the best approach to control webworms is the “10-year-old boy biological control” -- poke a stick into the webbing, and pull the web and inhabitants out and jump up and down on them. Or even better, you can poke a hole leave the exposed web to become food for birds and other beneficial insects.

Aeration Plugs2

Let Your Lawn Breathe Again!

October 13, 2017

 Your lawn is crying out for core aeration when the ground becomes compacted due to shade or heavily trafficked areas. Compaction can occur in a variety of places……where children play, on a footpath or in post-construction areas.

Compaction usually causes bare/worn looking patches in the lawn. The ground can feel hard underfoot.
Aeration is done with an aerating machine that removes soil plugs approximately 2-3 inches deep, allowing nutrients, air and water to penetrate down to the grass roots. The machine is hard to manage and is usually best handled by a professional.

The soil should be moist to begin.

Mark the irrigation system so it isn’t punctured.

Directly after aerating, spread seed and compost (or compost tea).

Water well.

The plugs will dry and return to the soil. If you are in a rush, they can be raked in.

The best time for aeration is NOW -- Fall --to get the best root regrowth and seed germination.

Ahh, that felt good!  

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The PRFCT time

September 30, 2017
Fall is the time for seeding, feeding, and aerating your lawn. Weeds grow in warm weather, grass prefers cool…that means the best time to fix the lawn is… fall, right now.
If there are bare areas in your lawn, reseed now, the grass can fill in and weeds will have no place to grow in the spring!
For areas that are always a problem, look for the cause.
If compacted: break up or aerate the soil.
Replace or amend poor soil with organic, weed free compost or new soil.
Too much shade? Try a shade tolerant grass or consider a Long Island native groundcover like Pennsylvania sedge and mow it just once a year.

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