PRFCT Tips

Tagged with "Seeding"

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The PRFCT time

September 30, 2017
Fall is the time for seeding, feeding, and aerating your lawn. Weeds grow in warm weather, grass prefers cool…that means the best time to fix the lawn is… fall, right now.
If there are bare areas in your lawn, reseed now, the grass can fill in and weeds will have no place to grow in the spring!
For areas that are always a problem, look for the cause.
If compacted: break up or aerate the soil.
Replace or amend poor soil with organic, weed free compost or new soil.
Too much shade? Try a shade tolerant grass or consider a Long Island native groundcover like Pennsylvania sedge and mow it just once a year.
Crabgrass with roots

Corn gluten is often recommended as an organic crabgrass pre-emergent, but studies on its effectiveness have been mixed. Precise timing is key to its success. Since corn gluten is an expensive treatment that can be hard to get right, we generally do not recommend it.

What to do instead? The best way to get rid of crabgrass organically is to crowd it out with healthy turf. Crabgrass is an annual that takes advantage of bare spots on your lawn in warm weather. The best time to establish a thick, lush lawn is in fall, but you can also overseed bare spots now so that new crabgrass does not have a sunny spot to sprout in summer.

Before you tackle your crabgrass issue, take a look at where the crabgrass is growing—you might learn something about your soil that will help you prevent it from coming back again.

Photo credit: mphillips007 / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Crabgrass

Ever noticed that crabgrass pops up in the same spot in your yard every year? It's trying to tell you something about the state of your soil.

Crabgrass thrives in conditions that turf grass cannot tolerate—hot, compacted, or poor soil. It especially loves the warm edges of sidewalks and pavement, and will quickly take advantage of any bare patches in your lawn.

What to do? Feeding, overseeding, and aerating your lawn this fall is key to preventing crabgrass next summer. Crabgrass seeds require plenty of light to germinate and will not be able to compete with your well-established, healthy turf.

For those hot spots near pavement, try using a heat-tolerant ground cover or crushed stone.

Mold on grass

Are You OVER Overseeding?

September 30, 2016

Fall's officially here, folks. Have you started overseeding your lawn? Are you OVER seeding? What's the difference?

Overseeding is the process of spreading seed over an existing lawn to fill in bare patches. How much seed to apply? Depends on the type of seed you are using. Look on the package for recommended rates.

Over seeding occurs when too much seed is applied over a given area. Why isn't more better? Too many grass plants growing too close together leads to overcompetition and die-off. In humid conditions, it can also cause mold and other fungus diseases like in the picture above. Gross.

Grass seed germinating

What do grass seeds have in common with pumpkin spice lattes, apple pies, and hay rides? They’re all best in fall.

Turf grasses are cool-season plants—they germinate and grow roots best in cool weather. Seeding your lawn in fall allows grass to become established and better able to out-compete warm-season weeds when they emerge in the spring.

This month is a good time to cut down (weed wack!) or pull out warm-season weeds in your lawn to make room for new cool-season grass seed. Don't worry about removing crabgrass roots—crabgrass is an annual, so those roots will die when cold weather hits. And then they're free organic material for your soil!

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