PRFCT Tips

Tagged with "Soil"

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The Buzz on Biochar

August 03, 2018

The Buzz on Biochar

Biomass charcoal (biochar) has become a soil health buzz word, but what is it exactly? Biochar is a carbon-rich solid material left over when organic matter (like wood, dry leaves or grasses) are burned at an extremely high temperature in the absence of oxygen – a process called pyrolysis. 

For use in gardens and landscapes, biochar should be added and mixed with your compost or potting soil before it is applied. The porous surface of biochar provides habitat for beneficial microbes that thrive in compost, protecting them from predation and drying while providing carbon for their energy needs. It also helps to retain soil moisture, minerals and nutrients for plant health and adds structure to sandy soils.

One great feature of biochar is that it remains in soil for hundreds and potentially thousands of years. Go ahead and add some biochar to your compost and soil mixes – it even helps sequester atmospheric carbon, PRFCT all around!

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Let Sleeping Logs Lie

June 01, 2018

The Living Dead

If dead standing timber it isn't going to fall on your house or car, leave it. In a state of decay, the tree is still a great home for the living, providing shelter to a multitude of wildlife from microbes and fungus to birds of prey. As it slowly disintegrates, it will feed the soil beneath.

Eventually the old tree will just fall over, continue to rot and provide habitat for ground-dwelling creatures. Remember, encouraging biodiversity is part of what makes a PRFCT place: each inhabitant has a role in a nature-based system. Removing biomass from your property is removing the food that your landscape has provided for itself. (And it's better than anything you can buy in the store!)

Neighborhood

Firstest Greenest Lawns

March 23, 2018

If a green lawn is a sign of health, then the first brightest, greenest lawn in the spring has to be good, right? If you knew that what it takes to make a lawn jump the season, you might think differently.

Nature has its own schedule, worked out over millenia. Greening up earlier than nature intends requires heavy doses of fast-acting nitrogen. Much of it ends up in runoff and pollutes your nearby beloved water bodies. Over-fertilization causes fast, weak growth, at the expense of deep, healthy roots. This chemical-fueled growth is more susceptible to fungal diseases and insect attacks, which means more chemicals will be needed later on to correct preventable issues. This is the beginning of a cycle of chemical dependence – your lawn on drugs.

Why do you need your lawn to be green before its time? Will you think differently? When you see early green lawns, will you give them the (green) thumbs down? Will you be proud that your lawn will not join the party until it is old enough to drink (natural nutrients) responsibly?

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Step 1: Relieve Your EcoAnxiety, Get Started.

Hi all, Emily here, the new PRFCT Environmental Outreach Coordinator and I want to help you relieve your eco-anxiety, which is exactly what it sounds like: a gnawing tension and fear that there’s nothing we can do to save the planet from doom. 

But here is an action you can start right away, so allow me to talk a little trash in this series about composting. According to the EPA, 30% of all solid waste sent to landfills is compostable organic matter. You can easily reclaim that 30% of “trash” and help turn it into environmentally beneficial material for your landscape.

It is easy. Purchase a container to collect kitchen scraps. I use a countertop container with a carbon filter. Edwina uses a 20-gallon flip-flip top garbage can with a removable (hole-free) bucket. City-dwellers, you can still do this! Freeze your compost in a bag and then either take it to a recycling center (yes, effort) or bring it with you to the country when you flee on the weekends.

Empty your container every few days where you plan to build your outdoor bin - next week we will show you how to design and build it.

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Let Your Lawn Breathe Again!

October 13, 2017

 Your lawn is crying out for core aeration when the ground becomes compacted due to shade or heavily trafficked areas. Compaction can occur in a variety of places……where children play, on a footpath or in post-construction areas.

Compaction usually causes bare/worn looking patches in the lawn. The ground can feel hard underfoot.
Aeration is done with an aerating machine that removes soil plugs approximately 2-3 inches deep, allowing nutrients, air and water to penetrate down to the grass roots. The machine is hard to manage and is usually best handled by a professional.

The soil should be moist to begin.

Mark the irrigation system so it isn’t punctured.

Directly after aerating, spread seed and compost (or compost tea).

Water well.

The plugs will dry and return to the soil. If you are in a rush, they can be raked in.

The best time for aeration is NOW -- Fall --to get the best root regrowth and seed germination.

Ahh, that felt good!  

If you're a landscape business owner and adhere to toxin-free practices, we invite you to register in our directory. Thanks!
https://perfectearthproject.org/professionals

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