PRFCT Tips

Tagged with "Watering"

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Wait to Irrigate

April 06, 2018

April showers provide plenty of water for May flowers, and lawns. So why irrigate now? This is the time when the weather is cool, your soil is moist way down deep and roots are happily growing and establishing themselves.

When your irrigation system is opened, don’t start the clock! Watering too much too early makes for lazy, shallow roots which will quickly dry out in the hot summer sun.

Wait to irrigate until your lawn and landscape really need water – generally not until mid-June. If you can see your footprints in the grass, it is wilted and could use a drink. More to follow on that when the time comes.

Sprinkler on lawn

When temps (finally!) start warming up in April, you may be tempted to start your summer irrigation regimen. But spring is the season to give your lawn a little tough love.

Why wait? Letting your lawn dry out in spring encourages it to grow deeper, stronger roots that will be better able to withstand periods of drought once summer rolls around. Too much water at any time of year creates conditions that promote disease, mosquitos, and ticks.

Until the ground dries to about 4" deep in late June, most lawns will be PRFCTly happy with spring rainfall. April showers bring May flowers...April irrigation brings fungus and bad bugs.

Need help knowing when to turn on your irrigation? A soil moisture meter is a must-have tool for watering success.

Tags: watering
Lawn puddle

Are You Feeling the Squish?

August 11, 2016

Mosquitos sucking the fun out of your summer?

Reduce the mosquito population on your property by reducing the wet conditions where mosquitos breed. PRFCT watering techniques—seldom and deep—prevent lawn puddles and surface moisture that attract mosquitos.

How to tell if your lawn is mosquito party central? If it hasn’t rained recently, but you hear a “squish squish” sound when you walk across your lawn, time to cut back on your watering.

Privet hedge

Sprinkling Your Hedges?

July 29, 2016

How much water do your privet hedges need this summer? Not much!

If your privet was planted over two years ago, let it be. Well-established trees and shrubs in good soil, including privets, do not need any irrigation.

Newly planted privets—less than two years in the ground—should only be watered at the base. Spraying the leaves is the principle cause of scale disease that will kill your privet. See our drip hoses tip for more info on where to place hoses and when to remove them.

Lawn mushroom

Does your lawn seem to turn into a mushroom patch overnight?

That's OK! Mushrooms generally do not indicate poor lawn health and will not damage your lawn. Typically, they are the fruiting bodies of beneficial soil fungi that sprout after a rainfall.

Don't want them? Knock them over with a rake or broom and wait for the sun to return.

If it hasn't been raining, those mushrooms may be caused by over watering or poor drainage. Remember our tip about watering seldom, watering deep?

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