PRFCT Tips

Tagged with "Wildlife"

2018 08 24

The Ten Step Program

August 24, 2018

Your Plants Are Food For Wildlife

If you see leaf damage, chances are it's the work of a beneficial insect. Bugs gotta eat too.  At the sign of a hole in your plant leaf DON'T SPRAY — just take 10 steps back.  Amazing... you won’t even notice it anymore.

Trees and shrubs are natural food for the caterpillars that songbirds need to feed their young. Plants are extremely resilient, being eaten is part of their job; a large percentage of leaf surface can be lost before it hurts the host plant.  

So step back, hold off on the spray... and don't worry about the bugs. When caterpillars hatch, songbirds won't be far behind!

Ticks Pixabay

Tick hysteria has begun and we hear you loud and clear, but there are some things to consider before spraying your lawn and landscape.

Ticks are HARD to kill. It's far more likely that your spraying will decimate populations of beneficial insects while the ticks continue to thrive.

Synthetic tick sprays are toxic and create a false sense of security. They kill pollinators (butterflies!), they do not kill all the ticks, and new ticks wander right back in soon after the spray is applied.

Spraying your property will also give you a false sense of security and could lead to less diligence when it comes to the things that really do prevent tick-borne disease: applying repellent, checking yourself, removing clothing promptly and showering shortly after spending time outdoors. 

The best way to protect from ticks is to spray yourself. Ticks hate cedar, so try to find a product that uses cedar oil.

Ticks also like moisture so if you wait to irrigate and water seldom, the better off you will be. Established shrubs and trees (places ticks love to hang out) do not need watering, and your lawn really only needs one good long drink per week in the event of no rainfall. 

Photo by Jared Belson

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