PRFCT Tips

grass cut with a dull blade

How Sharp Are Your Blades?

August 05, 2016

Can't remember the last time you sharpened your lawnmower blades? Then your mower is probably overdue.

Why does it matter? Dull mower blades tear grass, which invites fungus infections. If your grass has ragged edges or you can see white fibers hanging from the tips, your mower blades are too dull.

Tags: mowing disease
Privet hedge

Sprinkling Your Hedges?

July 29, 2016

How much water do your privet hedges need this summer? Not much!

If your privet was planted over two years ago, let it be. Well-established trees and shrubs in good soil, including privets, do not need any irrigation.

Newly planted privets—less than two years in the ground—should only be watered at the base. Spraying the leaves is the principle cause of scale disease that will kill your privet. See our drip hoses tip for more info on where to place hoses and when to remove them.

Lawn mushroom

Does your lawn seem to turn into a mushroom patch overnight?

That's OK! Mushrooms generally do not indicate poor lawn health and will not damage your lawn. Typically, they are the fruiting bodies of beneficial soil fungi that sprout after a rainfall.

Don't want them? Knock them over with a rake or broom and wait for the sun to return.

If it hasn't been raining, those mushrooms may be caused by over watering or poor drainage. Remember our tip about watering seldom, watering deep?

sprinkler

Summer Watering 101

July 15, 2016

It's hot. Is your lawn looking not-so-hot?

Watering frequently may seem like the best way to perk up your grass during warm weather, but beware! Over watering (every day or two) can encourage shallow rooting, fungus diseases, nutrient run off, and mosquitos.

What is the PRFCT amount? It varies by soil type, amount of sun, and amount of water per minute you are applying. PRFCT watering is seldom and deep to encourage roots to grow down below the hot, dry surface.

Rule of thumb for well-established lawns: Wet the soil 6" down, then allow to dry 4-6" down before watering again. How to tell? Dig a hole or use a soil moisture meter.

Tags: watering
Compost

To Brew? Or Not to Brew?

July 08, 2016

Last week, we talked about the benefits of natural fertilizers like compost and compost tea. So what's the difference between the two? Why brew tea when you could just apply compost?

COMPOST:

+ High in microbial content to feed your soil
+ Contains some soluble nutrients to feed your plants
+ Rich in organic matter that helps improve soil structure
– Heavy and messy to apply
– Will end up all over your clothes (and your kids and pets) if you play on a lawn treated with compost. Best to apply in spring or fall.

COMPOST TEA:

+ High in microbial content to feed your soil
+ Contains some soluble nutrients to feed your plants
+ Only requires a small amount of compost to feed a large area of land
+ Easy to apply throughout the year using a sprayer or watering can
+ Good for lawns or gardens that need to recharge their microbial battery
– Does not contain organic matter for your soil
– Requires special equipment to brew (but our how-to instructions make it easy)

More Tips