PRFCT Tips

Tagged with "Birds"

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Prevent Kamikaze Birds!

August 31, 2018

Saving Birds From Killer Collisions

We've all heard that sickening thunk when a bird flies into your window.  Up to one billion birds are estimated to die every year in the US due to window collisions, mostly with low-rise buildings and residences.

Birds hit glass because it reflects light and mirrors the outside landscape, making it  hard for birds to tell where the outdoors ends and the indoors begin. Try going outside and examine your windows from a bird's point of view at morning, noon and evening. Do they reflect trees or sky?

If so, or if they have a history of bird crashes, try these deterrents:

  1. Fun for kids and good for the environment: Repurpose your old CDs and turn them into hanging suncatchers, to warn birds away.  
  2. For a much more subtle fix, purchase ABC bird tape – a translucent tape developed by the American Bird Conservancy that lasts for years, letting plenty of light in. The tape strips or squares should be spaced no more than 2-4" apart. (Birds will try to fly through larger gaps.)
  3. You can also create your own designs using basic craft supplies like tempura paint or window markers, again keeping the 2-4" spacing in mind.
Tags: birds habitat
2018 08 24

The Ten Step Program

August 24, 2018

Your Plants Are Food For Wildlife

If you see leaf damage, chances are it's the work of a beneficial insect. Bugs gotta eat too.  At the sign of a hole in your plant leaf DON'T SPRAY — just take 10 steps back.  Amazing... you won’t even notice it anymore.

Trees and shrubs are natural food for the caterpillars that songbirds need to feed their young. Plants are extremely resilient, being eaten is part of their job; a large percentage of leaf surface can be lost before it hurts the host plant.  

So step back, hold off on the spray... and don't worry about the bugs. When caterpillars hatch, songbirds won't be far behind!

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Let Sleeping Logs Lie

June 01, 2018

The Living Dead

If dead standing timber it isn't going to fall on your house or car, leave it. In a state of decay, the tree is still a great home for the living, providing shelter to a multitude of wildlife from microbes and fungus to birds of prey. As it slowly disintegrates, it will feed the soil beneath.

Eventually the old tree will just fall over, continue to rot and provide habitat for ground-dwelling creatures. Remember, encouraging biodiversity is part of what makes a PRFCT place: each inhabitant has a role in a nature-based system. Removing biomass from your property is removing the food that your landscape has provided for itself. (And it's better than anything you can buy in the store!)

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Pre-emergent are herbicides designed to kill weed seeds BEFORE they sprout. They are usually granular and are applied to lawns and flower beds in the spring, but they persist for three months – that means prolonged time for human exposure. 

Below we have gathered important information about some typical active ingredients and their effects:

Prodiamine – carcinogen, neurotoxicity
Pendimethalin – extremely toxic to fish and aquatic organisms
Isoxaben – possible carcinogen, kidney/liver damage, toxic to birds
Oxyfluorfen – possible carcinogen, reproductive, birth and development effects, kidney/liver damage, skin irritant, toxic to fish and aquatic organisms
Oryzalin – kidney/liver damage, skin irritant, birth and developmental effects, toxic to fish and aquatic organisms
Trifluralin – extremely toxic to fish and aquatic organisms

Also, since the active ingredient is usually only 1% ... what are the 99% "other ingredients" ? They are often a blend of equally toxic ingredients that amplify the deadly effectiveness, which means they are even more toxic for you too.

Safe alternative? Although corn-gluten is often recommended as an organic pre-emergent for lawns, it is expensive, and timing is too critical to be effective, so we don’t recommend it. The PRFCT nature-based approach to weed control is to outcompete weeds in lawns. Overseed lawns in the fall or early spring before weeds germinate. In shrub and flower beds plant many small plants close together, leaving little to no space or sun for weeds. More plants is always a better option for filling space than bark mulches from far away.

Icy path in winter

De-icers—even those labeled “natural”—can have nasty side effects. Many products burn pets’ paws, mouths, and throats when ingested. (Just think about the damage they do to concrete and cars…) Most contain salts that damage soil, dehydrate (and kill!) plants and trees, and pollute drinking and surface water.

Is it safe to salt your sidewalk? Not really—most products will have some downside. But slippery sidewalks aren’t safe, either. Instead of risking falls, take the following steps to minimize the impact of de-icer on your landscape, your pets, and the environment:

  • Use the bare minimum. Whenever possible, turn to elbow grease instead of chemicals. Remember: The point of de-icer is to make ice easier to shovel, not remove it completely. Read the product label for recommended application rates, and if possible, use less.
  • Apply de-icer BEFORE the storm hits. Preventing ice from forming requires less product (and elbow grease) than removing it once hardened.
  • Keep de-icing products away from your garden beds. Anything you apply will affect your soil’s composition, potentially damaging your plants.
  • Avoid products containing nitrogen-based urea. While it may be less-toxic for pets than salt, the nitrogen in these synthetic products eventually ends up in nearby bodies of water, contributing to algal blooms and other pollution.
  • Sprinkle bird seed, instead of sand or kitty litter, on ice to improve traction. Seed will not melt snow or ice, but will make pathways less slippery and provide a welcome winter meal for your feathered friends. Sprinkling sand or kitty litter creates a mess and can clog sewers and drains.
  • Put your pups in booties when taking winter walks. In addition to insulating their paws from cold pavement, you’ll protect them from irritation caused by salt and other de-icers. Plus…cute!

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