PRFCT Tips

Tagged with "Lawn care"

Organic Seed Catalogs

The seed catalogs are arriving and if you’re like us, you can’t wait to dive in but may be wondering what is the benefit of opting for organic seed?

Conventional seed production is one of the most chemically intensive types of agriculture, and is controlled by a handful of companies. Since seed crops are not for human consumption, pesticide regulation is lax. Crops grown for seed must go through their entire life-cycle before they can produce seeds. To combat pests and diseases during their long life-cycle, pesticides are applied liberally and often.

On the other hand, organic seed crops are managed to increase resiliency, focusing on soil health to provide nutrients and bolster plants’ highly adaptive immune systems. Groundbreaking research in the fields of epigenetics has proven that plants even pass along information to their offspring to help them better respond to the growing conditions experienced by the parents, but this only happens if your plants have been exposed to natural challenges versus spraying synthetic chemicals and disrupting this process. To sum it up: organic seeds grow better organically!

Organic seeds have a profound potential for improving our food and agriculture systems. Seeds can be adapted for warmer or dryer conditions, for water use efficiency, for improved nutritional content, and for flavor!

Where to buy seeds adapted to your area:

Northeast:

Harris Seeds (NY)  High Mowing Seed Company (VT) Hudson Valley Seed Company (NY) Fedco Seeds (ME) Johnny's Selected Seeds (ME) Turtle Tree Biodynamic Seed Initiative (NY)

Northwest:

Adaptive Seeds (OR) Seattle Seed Company (WA) Territorial Seed Company (OR) Wild Garden Seed (OR) 

Midwest:

Annie's Heirloom Seed Co. (MI)  Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Co. (MO) Seed Saver's Exchange (IA)

Southeast: 

South Georgia Seed Company (GA) Southern Exposure Seed Exchange (VA) Sow True Seed (NC) Vegetable Seed Warehouse (SC) 

Southwest:

BBB Seed (CO) Farm Direct Organic Seed (CO) Native Seeds/SEARCH (AZ) Renee's Garden Seeds (CA) Seeds of Change (CA) Sustainable Seed Company (CA)

Land Contract Prfct Tip

Read Between the Lines of Your Pesticide Program 

It’s the time of year when landscape contracts are headed your way and we think it’s important you know how to read between the lines. This sample is a landscape contract that was sent out this month in NY. If your landscaper follows a standard pesticide program, chances are yours will be similar.

Many states mandate that any chemical applied to your lawn is disclosed in your contract. This includes Minimum Risk Pesticides, sometimes called 25(b)’s, which Perfect Earth Project would say are okay to use. An example would be a biopesticide which is a naturally occurring substance or a microorganism that is applied to control pests.

But when it comes to synthetic lawn and landscape chemicals, do not turn a blind eye. The more you know, the better choices you can make to seek alternatives and keep yourself and your loved ones safe.

Don’t fire your landscaper, talk to them. Find out if any of the “targets” are even issues in your lawn. We can help you talk to your landscaper about kicking the toxic synthetic chemical habit. 

Just this one contract would mean exposure to probable carcinogens, and substances linked to neurotoxicity, endocrine disruption, neuromuscular effects, birth and reproductive effects, kidney and liver damage and canine lymphoma. They are toxic to pollinators, birds, fish and aquatic organisms and pollute our aquifers.

If your lawn can be just as beautiful without synthetic chemicals, why would you expose yourself to this?

You can download this .PDF to share with your family, friends, neighbors, school administrators and legislators. 

Aeration Plugs2

Let Your Lawn Breathe Again!

October 13, 2017

 Your lawn is crying out for core aeration when the ground becomes compacted due to shade or heavily trafficked areas. Compaction can occur in a variety of places……where children play, on a footpath or in post-construction areas.

Compaction usually causes bare/worn looking patches in the lawn. The ground can feel hard underfoot.
Aeration is done with an aerating machine that removes soil plugs approximately 2-3 inches deep, allowing nutrients, air and water to penetrate down to the grass roots. The machine is hard to manage and is usually best handled by a professional.

The soil should be moist to begin.

Mark the irrigation system so it isn’t punctured.

Directly after aerating, spread seed and compost (or compost tea).

Water well.

The plugs will dry and return to the soil. If you are in a rush, they can be raked in.

The best time for aeration is NOW -- Fall --to get the best root regrowth and seed germination.

Ahh, that felt good!  

If you're a landscape business owner and adhere to toxin-free practices, we invite you to register in our directory. Thanks!
https://perfectearthproject.org/professionals

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The PRFCT time

September 30, 2017
Fall is the time for seeding, feeding, and aerating your lawn. Weeds grow in warm weather, grass prefers cool…that means the best time to fix the lawn is… fall, right now.

If there are bare areas in your lawn, reseed now, the grass can fill in and weeds will have no place to grow in the spring! But, don't over seed! Over seeding is the process of spreading seed over an existing lawn to fill in bare patches. How much seed to apply? Depends on the type of seed you are using. Look on the package for recommended rates.
Over seeding occurs when too much seed is applied over a given area. Why isn't more better? Too many grass plants growing too close together leads to over competition and die-off. In humid conditions, it can also cause mold and other fungus diseases like in the picture above. Gross.

For areas that are always a problem, look for the cause.
If compacted: break up or aerate the soil.
Replace or amend poor soil with organic, weed free compost or new soil.
Too much shade? Try a shade tolerant grass or consider a Long Island native ground cover like Pennsylvania sedge and mow it just once a year.
Atrazine molecule

Atrazine is the second most widely used pesticide in the US (after glyphosate), with over 73 million pounds applied each year. A common agricultural pesticide, atrazine also is used on turf for broadleaf and grassy weed control. Because atrazine kills cool-season grasses like Kentucky Bluegrass, it is primarily used on lawns in warmer climates (ie. the Southeastern United States).

In humans, atrazine has been linked to:
• Endocrine disruption (what does this mean, anyway?)
• Cancer
• Birth defects and reproductive disorders
• Neurological effects
• Kidney and liver damage
• Eye and skin irritation

How are people exposed to atrazine? Not just direct contact with treated lawns, fields, and food. Atrazine is found in 94% of drinking water tested by the USDA, usually spiking in spring and summer months when it's most heavily applied. Even at extremely low levels, atrazine can interfere with human hormones, fetal development, and fertility. The European Union banned its use in 2004 over concerns that it is a groundwater contaminant.

What is endocrine disruption?

Your endocrine system is the set of glands and hormones they produce (such as estrogen, testosterone, and adrenaline) that help guide your development, growth, and reproduction. Some chemicals—known as endocrine disruptors—mimic your hormones, block hormone absorption, or otherwise alter the concentration of hormones in your body. Endocrine disrupting chemicals have been linked to ADHD, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, cancers, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, obesity, early puberty, infertility, and other reproductive disorders.

Sources: Beyond Pesticides and Pesticide Action Network

Photo credit: Lacuna Design / Getty Images

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