PRFCT Tips

Tagged with "Spring"

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Hi I'm Olive. Even though I stay indoors, that doesn't mean I am safe from lawn and landscape chemicals. Dangerous lawn and landscape chemicals can be tracked inside on shoes and clothing. Once indoors, out of direct sunlight, chemicals can persist in fabrics and on rugs for up to TWO YEARS!

I love to nap on the couch, to play and roll on the rug, (and if you ask me, shoes are fantastic to chew!) The problem is my soft paws, underbelly, eyes and noses are all susceptible to chemical exposure, and chemicals cause everything from minor skin irritation to liver, kidney and GI tract damage in cats.

#protectyourpet

Please keep poisons out of my house, make a donation to the PRFCT #protectyourpet campaign and spread the message.

Thank you!
Olive Juniper
@olive_bythesea

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A PRFCT Tip from Clover

April 20, 2018

No Poison on My Paws

Keep an eye out on your walks this month. This is the time of year that people think their lawns need chemical applications in order to be green and beautiful (false!)

#protectyourpet 

Look for little pellets in the grass, yellow pesticide application signs and move your walk to the other side of the road, especially if your precious pet is with you! Our soft paws, underbelly, eyes and noses are all susceptible to chemical exposure. They are linked to health hazards from skin rashes to bladder cancer and canine lymphoma.

Please keep poisons off my paws, make a donation to the PRFCT #protectyourpet campaign and spread the message.

Thank you!
Clover von Gal

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Wait to Irrigate

April 06, 2018

April showers provide plenty of water for May flowers, and lawns. So why irrigate now? This is the time when the weather is cool, your soil is moist way down deep and roots are happily growing and establishing themselves.

When your irrigation system is opened, don’t start the clock! Watering too much too early makes for lazy, shallow roots which will quickly dry out in the hot summer sun.

Wait to irrigate until your lawn and landscape really need water – generally not until mid-June. If you can see your footprints in the grass, it is wilted and could use a drink. More to follow on that when the time comes.

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Pre-emergent are herbicides designed to kill weed seeds BEFORE they sprout. They are usually granular and are applied to lawns and flower beds in the spring, but they persist for three months – that means prolonged time for human exposure. 

Below we have gathered important information about some typical active ingredients and their effects:

Prodiamine – carcinogen, neurotoxicity
Pendimethalin – extremely toxic to fish and aquatic organisms
Isoxaben – possible carcinogen, kidney/liver damage, toxic to birds
Oxyfluorfen – possible carcinogen, reproductive, birth and development effects, kidney/liver damage, skin irritant, toxic to fish and aquatic organisms
Oryzalin – kidney/liver damage, skin irritant, birth and developmental effects, toxic to fish and aquatic organisms
Trifluralin – extremely toxic to fish and aquatic organisms

Also, since the active ingredient is usually only 1% ... what are the 99% "other ingredients" ? They are often a blend of equally toxic ingredients that amplify the deadly effectiveness, which means they are even more toxic for you too.

Safe alternative? Although corn-gluten is often recommended as an organic pre-emergent for lawns, it is expensive, and timing is too critical to be effective, so we don’t recommend it. The PRFCT nature-based approach to weed control is to outcompete weeds in lawns. Overseed lawns in the fall or early spring before weeds germinate. In shrub and flower beds plant many small plants close together, leaving little to no space or sun for weeds. More plants is always a better option for filling space than bark mulches from far away.

Neighborhood

Firstest Greenest Lawns

March 23, 2018

If a green lawn is a sign of health, then the first brightest, greenest lawn in the spring has to be good, right? If you knew that what it takes to make a lawn jump the season, you might think differently.

Nature has its own schedule, worked out over millenia. Greening up earlier than nature intends requires heavy doses of fast-acting nitrogen. Much of it ends up in runoff and pollutes your nearby beloved water bodies. Over-fertilization causes fast, weak growth, at the expense of deep, healthy roots. This chemical-fueled growth is more susceptible to fungal diseases and insect attacks, which means more chemicals will be needed later on to correct preventable issues. This is the beginning of a cycle of chemical dependence – your lawn on drugs.

Why do you need your lawn to be green before its time? Will you think differently? When you see early green lawns, will you give them the (green) thumbs down? Will you be proud that your lawn will not join the party until it is old enough to drink (natural nutrients) responsibly?

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