PRFCT Tips

Tagged with "Lawn care"

Common landscape chemicals

What's Going on Your Lawn?

December 21, 2016

Many people never ask whether their landscapers are using chemicals. Are you walking across a toxic lawn to get to your organic vegetable garden?

In many places, landscapers are required by law to inform the person hiring them of any pesticides—natural or synthetic—used on a property. These chemicals are often listed in your contract by brand name and EPA registration number. (All pesticides must be registered with the EPA, but that does not mean they are safe for humans or the environment!)

When your landscaper sends your contract for renewal, take a close look (many people don’t!). See words ending in "–cide"? Long chemical-sounding names that you can’t pronounce? References to "weed and feed" or "broad spectrum" applications? Time to ask your landscapers which chemicals they are using and why, and let them know you want to have a PRFCT landscape.

If they have questions about getting started, send them our way. Please don’t fire them—we want to convert them! With your help, we can transform every landscape professional into a land steward.

Lawn puddle

Are You Feeling the Squish?

August 11, 2016

Mosquitos sucking the fun out of your summer?

Reduce the mosquito population on your property by reducing the wet conditions where mosquitos breed. PRFCT watering techniques—seldom and deep—prevent lawn puddles and surface moisture that attract mosquitos.

How to tell if your lawn is mosquito party central? If it hasn’t rained recently, but you hear a “squish squish” sound when you walk across your lawn, time to cut back on your watering.

grass cut with a dull blade

How Sharp Are Your Blades?

August 05, 2016

Can't remember the last time you sharpened your lawnmower blades? Then your mower is probably overdue.

Why does it matter? Dull mower blades tear grass, which invites fungus infections. If your grass has ragged edges or you can see white fibers hanging from the tips, your mower blades are too dull.

Lawn mushroom

Does your lawn seem to turn into a mushroom patch overnight?

That's OK! Mushrooms generally do not indicate poor lawn health and will not damage your lawn. Typically, they are the fruiting bodies of beneficial soil fungi that sprout after a rainfall.

Don't want them? Knock them over with a rake or broom and wait for the sun to return.

If it hasn't been raining, those mushrooms may be caused by over watering or poor drainage. Remember our tip about watering seldom, watering deep?

Lawn soil

Is Your Lawn Pickled?

May 25, 2016

Worried about thatch? If you're fertilizing PRFCTly, you don't have to be.

Thatch is a naturally occurring layer of decaying material that accumulates in soil. A ½" layer of thatch is healthy. It acts as insulation for soil and roots and a cushion for your kids' knees when they fall on the grass.

Thatch build-up is not caused by the presence of grass clippings. In fact, having organic material like grass clippings on your lawn feeds the same microbes that remove excess thatch from your soil.

Problems occur when soil is pickled by the salts and acids in chemical fertilizers and pesticides, preventing the natural composting process from taking place. Material builds up, resulting in a thick layer of thatch that attracts pests and creates conditions for fungus to spread.

Instead, prevent thatch build-up by fertilizing your lawn with natural fertilizers like compost tea and, of course, grass clippings.

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