PRFCT Tips

Tagged with "Soil"

leave in grass

How much to water in the fall? Not at all!

Turn off your irrigation! Your lawn and landscape does not need supplemental water in typically cool, moist, fall weather. This is the time to encourage roots to grow deep and strong: resilient and ready for hot and dry weather next summer. 



However, as a final treat to your plants, and their roots, before heading into the long cold winter, you might need to give them a long deep drink, making sure there is plenty of moisture way down in the soil before your irrigation system is shut down for the winter. How to do that?

First, test to see how deep your moisture lies (need a moisture meter?). It needs to be at least 6” deep. If it is wet, all is well. If it is dry down there, water away. It could mean for hours: think the equivalent of a day or two of rain. Consider dividing watering into two consecutive days to allow water to penetrate, especially in heavier soils.

grass

First things first. Before jumping into your fall lawn renovation, start by identifying your trouble spots. Now is the PRFCT time to look since the heat of the summer makes problem areas more visible.

We suggest devoting an afternoon to exploring your property. Or, have your landscape professional make a list and discuss it with you.

Do you have moss, fungus or mushrooms: probably overwatering. Bare patches? Water, soil, or turf grass types could be the culprits.  Start with gathering some invisible information: your soil health. You can check the pH yourself with a simple litmus test, or better yet, get a complete soil test Cornell Corporative Extension of Suffolk County or Soil FoodWeb New York.

irrigation

Do not rely on your irrigation company to set the timer on your sprinkler system. Irrigation companies are water delivery experts; they are NOT lawn care experts.

You or your landscaper should decide the schedule that best fits your lawn's needs.

Remember there is such a thing as too much of a good thing. Over watering promotes shallow rooting, fungus diseases, mosquitos and nutrient run off.

More Tips