PRFCT Tips

Tagged with "Sustainability"

seedlings

Now that you have the PRFCT grass seed, it’s time to lay it down and have a PRFCT LAWN

1. Mow Short: Mow lawn with mower at lowest setting. Open bare patches to receive the seed.

2. Remove Clippings: Make sure the seed will meet the soil.

3. Aerate: Just in compacted areas like paths, and when doing total lawn renovations.

4. Apply Compost or Compost Tea: Allow to dry, then rake or drag the clumps smooth.

5. Freeze Your Seeds (optional): Put seed in freezer for 48 hours to crack seed coat and halve germination time.

6. Spread the Seed: How much? It varies a lot by seed type. Follow the instructions on your seed mix or see our website for typical amounts. Do not over do it! Crowded seeds compete and struggle.

7. Water: Seeds needs to be moist until established: Light watering (i.e. several times a day for 5 minutes each) until grass is at least 1.5 inches.

grasses

Grass is grass, right? Actually, no. Choosing the right seed makes a big difference.

There are four main types of grass, each with its own personality.
Kentucky Bluegrass: Classic color and texture, disease prone, tolerates high traffic.
Perennial Rye: Fast growing, strong roots, needs full sun, poor drought tolerance. *
Fine Fescues: Tolerate shade and acid soil, low fertilizer, light traffic.
Tall Fescues: Drought, insect, disease resistant. Moderate shade/full sun. Fast growing. The best for Long Island.

Grasses are generally sold as mixes of these varieties. How to choose? There is no absolutely correct mix, so take our suggestions as a guide and find a local provider who is knowledgeable.

We recommend this for Northeast lawns:
Sunny Lawns:
Medium to High Maintenance: 65% Kentucky Bluegrass**, several different varieties 15% Perennial Rye 20% Fine Fescues.
Low Maintenance: 65% Fine Fescues Blend, 15% Perennial Rye, 20% Kentucky Bluegrass. Or 100% Tall Fescues blend.
Shady Lawns:
Average to Low Traffic: 100% Fine Fescues blend. Or Shady Tall Fescues.***
Got Bare Patches?
Mixes with at least 10% Kentucky Bluegrass will help fill in patchy areas.

*Annual Rye (vs. Perennial) is included in many contractor mixes. Fills in fast, then dies, creating space for weeds. Not recommended.
**For high traffic lawns use a Bluegrass heavy mix.
***High traffic doesn't work in the shade. Consider using path materials

crabgrass

You have to hand it to crabgrass. The pesky weed certainly knows how to take advantage of an opportunity. Healthy grass guards itself against weeds. But, when grass becomes distressed, take for instance by the summer heat, crabgrass wastes no time moving right in to bare spots.

Crabgrass thrives in conditions that turf grass cannot tolerate—hot, compacted, or poor soil. It especially loves the warm edges of sidewalks and pavement, and will quickly take advantage of any bare patches in your lawn.

What to do? Feeding, over seeding, and aerating your lawn this fall is key to preventing crabgrass next summer. Crabgrass seeds require plenty of light to germinate and will not be able to compete with your well-established, healthy turf.

For those hot spots near pavement, try using a heat-tolerant ground cover or crushed stone.

The PRFCT way to curb its spread is to take away its opportunity.

Start in the summer by getting rid of crabgrass before it goes to seed. Remove small patches with boiling water or by pulling it out at the root. Alternatively, there are toxin-free, vinegar-based products available in stores. 

Corn gluten is often recommended as an organic crabgrass pre-emergent, but studies on its effectiveness have been mixed. Precise timing is key to its success. Since corn gluten is an expensive treatment that can be hard to get right, we generally do not recommend it.

These strategies will hold you over until the fall when it is time to take steps to prevent crabgrass from returning. 

mole

If you have ever had moles, you know they can make quite a mess.

Though they provide some benefits such as aerating compact soil and eating grubs; this year we have seen a population spike that has us saying enough with the moles already!

Fortunately, there are toxin-free methods that can help:

Break Out Your Stomping Shoes: Stepping on mole tunnels to collapse them may be the simplest way of solving the problem. After repeatedly having their tunnels flattened moles will move to a less frustrating place to live.

Go Shopping: Another toxin-free option to keep moles away is to use castor oil-based repellents are available in stores.

clover

One hundred years ago, clover was considered a sign of a "healthy" lawn. Diversity was prized and the ideal lawn was sprinkled with flowers. Lawns fertilized themselves naturally with regular boosts of nitrogen from clover and mulched grass clippings.

What changed? Chemical companies found themselves with lots of extra product on their hands after the end of World War II. Some of those products could be turned into fertilizer, and some could be used as herbicides. Marketing teams turned clover into the new enemy, selling consumers herbicides to rid their yards of "weeds" and synthetic fertilizers to replace what those "weeds" supplied naturally. Before long, the uniform, military-style lawn became all the rage.

There are those who use a lot of energy and toxins to keep clover out of their lawns. What’s wrong with clover anyway?

Clover fixes nitrogen, providing important nutrients to keep your lawn healthy and reduce the need for fertilizer.

Clover adds green to those hot dry difficult spots that grass doesn’t like, helping your lawn to look lively and lush. Stop wasting time and money trying to kill clover….think different, embrace it for all the good it can do!

And look for the one with four leaves…..

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