PRFCT Tips

Tagged with "Fall"

Leaves on lawn

Give Your Rake a Break

October 21, 2016

Got leaves on your lawn? This time of year, who doesn't?

We've got good news: Instead of spending your weekend raking and bagging, you can run your mower right over those leaves instead. Mulched leaves not only protect and feed the plants you love, they also help control plants you don't love. Next spring, those chopped up leaf bits can block sunlight from germinating dandelion seeds and other sun-loving weeds.

Need a special mower? Not necessarily. Mulching mowers are most effective, but regular mowers mulch leaves, too. Run your mower over the leaves a couple times and be sure to bag your mower bag.

Crabgrass

Ever noticed that crabgrass pops up in the same spot in your yard every year? It's trying to tell you something about the state of your soil.

Crabgrass thrives in conditions that turf grass cannot tolerate—hot, compacted, or poor soil. It especially loves the warm edges of sidewalks and pavement, and will quickly take advantage of any bare patches in your lawn.

What to do? Feeding, overseeding, and aerating your lawn this fall is key to preventing crabgrass next summer. Crabgrass seeds require plenty of light to germinate and will not be able to compete with your well-established, healthy turf.

For those hot spots near pavement, try using a heat-tolerant ground cover or crushed stone.

Mold on grass

Are You OVER Overseeding?

September 30, 2016

Fall's officially here, folks. Have you started overseeding your lawn? Are you OVER seeding? What's the difference?

Overseeding is the process of spreading seed over an existing lawn to fill in bare patches. How much seed to apply? Depends on the type of seed you are using. Look on the package for recommended rates.

Over seeding occurs when too much seed is applied over a given area. Why isn't more better? Too many grass plants growing too close together leads to overcompetition and die-off. In humid conditions, it can also cause mold and other fungus diseases like in the picture above. Gross.

Grass seed germinating

What do grass seeds have in common with pumpkin spice lattes, apple pies, and hay rides? They’re all best in fall.

Turf grasses are cool-season plants—they germinate and grow roots best in cool weather. Seeding your lawn in fall allows grass to become established and better able to out-compete warm-season weeds when they emerge in the spring.

This month is a good time to cut down (weed wack!) or pull out warm-season weeds in your lawn to make room for new cool-season grass seed. Don't worry about removing crabgrass roots—crabgrass is an annual, so those roots will die when cold weather hits. And then they're free organic material for your soil!

grass cut with a dull blade

How Sharp Are Your Blades?

August 05, 2016

Can't remember the last time you sharpened your lawnmower blades? Then your mower is probably overdue.

Why does it matter? Dull mower blades tear grass, which invites fungus infections. If your grass has ragged edges or you can see white fibers hanging from the tips, your mower blades are too dull.

Tags: mowing disease

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